What type of cases does CAIR Coalition place with pro bono teams?

What type of cases does CAIR Coalition place with pro bono teams?

There are numerous defenses to deportation which a detained immigrant can employ in fighting their case. When working with pro bono teams, our clients’ cases typically fall into one of the following categories:

  • Children’s Asylum—available to children with a well-founded fear of persecution in their home country on account of race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group, or political opinion. These cases generally do not involve in-court litigation.
  • Adult Asylum—available to adult immigrants who fear returning to their home country on the basis of a protected ground. Alternatively, clients often apply for “withholding of removal” and/or protection under the “Convention Against Torture.” These are also fear-based relief options, but have slightly different legal thresholds from a standard asylum claim. These cases provide in-court litigation experience.
  • Special Immigrant Juvenile Status (SIJS)—available to unaccompanied immigrant children who have been abused, neglected, or abandoned, who cannot be reunified with one or both parents, and for whom returning to their home country is not in their best interest.  SIJS requires two approvals, one from a state family court and one from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.
  • T-Visa—available to child or adult victims of human trafficking (sex or labor, generally) who are in the U.S. on account of that trafficking, and who would suffer extreme hardship if removed from the U.S. T-Visa cases do not require an interview or hearing.
  • U-Visa—available to immigrant victims of certain serious crimes who have been, or will likely be, helpful in the investigation and prosecution of those crimes. U-Visas are available to both children and adult immigrants. U-Visa cases do not require an interview or hearing.
  • Green Card Defense—available to certain long-time Green Card Holders who find themselves in removal proceedings as a result of criminal charges. They can apply for a one-time discretionary waiver that permits an Immigration Judge to cancel the removal. These cases provide in-court litigation experience.
  • Federal Habeas Corpus—a special form of relief available to noncitizens that face prolonged or indefinite detention, with the goal of securing their release. The habeas petition is filed in the federal district court near the detention facility that holds the client.

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