Advocacy and Asylum: Honduran Man Stuck in Detention Needs Help Moving His Fear-Based Case Forward

Carlos* is a Honduran man who left his country because he was repeatedly threatened after he witnessed the murder of a close friend. Carlos received a negative response to his reasonable fear interview in April and has been in immigration detention since. Carlos requested a review of this response, but he still has not been referred to the immigration court, and he has endured mistreatment and racist comments from the deportation officer who holds the power to refer him. Carlos needs an advocate to help him obtain his day in court and to present his claims for fear-based relief.

All CAIR Coalition matters placed with a pro bono team are robustly mentored by a CAIR Coalition attorney. Our mentoring program includes an opening meeting to discuss the scope and process of the matter, provision of samples, guidance on the law, review of draft filings, assistance with client contact, and guidance on preparation for interviews and hearings.

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Carlos* is a 31-year-old man from Honduras. In 2012, he witnessed the murder of his close friend, Felix*. Carlos heard the gunshots and saw the getaway car, and the killers know that Carlos can identify them. The killers threatened Carlos’s life on multiple occasions and shot at him in 2017. Carlos reported the threats to the police and tried relocating within Honduras, but neither strategy worked.

Carlos fled to the United States in February 2018. He has been in immigration detention since March and received a negative response to his Reasonable Fear Interview in early April. The Asylum Officer who interviewed Carlos found him credible but found that Carlos had not articulated a fear of harm on account of a protected ground such as membership in a particular social ground.

Carlos requested a review of this response, but he still has not been referred to the immigration court. While he has been waiting for his day in court, his deportation officer has mistreated him. Among other things, the deportation officer has called him a “monkey” and threatened that could slow down the referral process.

Carlos needs a pro bono team to advocate for a review of his negative finding, assist him in overturning the finding, then bringing his claim to court.

Carlos is detained in Farmville, Virginia, and speaks Spanish.

Please contact our Pro Bono Coordinating Attorney, Jennifer Grishkin at Jennifer@caircoalition.org, if you are interested in taking this case.

*Pseudonyms are used to protect privacy.